Thursday, 18 January 2018
USA & CANADA

USA & CANADA (175)

Latest News

Eyitayo Dada talks about marriage, Nigerian churches, her new book etc on Canadian Radio today

Sunday, 22 October 2017 09:06 Written by

Mrs Eyitayo Dada Lawyer, Evangelist and  Speaker will be talking about her new book, marriages, Nigerian Churches in Nigeria today.   Listen to her today on CHIN Radio, Tune to Fm 91.9FM  or 1540am.  She speaks in Yoruba  - Nigerian Language.    

 

Listen to her today, Sunday october 22, 2017 from 5.30pm-6.00pm on CHIN Radio; 91.9FM and 1540am.    Call in to ask questions, she is the "Doctor" in the House tomorrow for Making your Marriage or relationship work.   She will tell you how to get your own copy of the book.  

For people outside Toronto (International) visit www.chinradio.com listening live.  (Click on the Yoruba language)   5.30pm-6.00pm

Call in Live 4168701540,  Please call in to the program anywhere you are in the world to contribute to the program. Make comment, congratulate, good wishes etc.

 

 
 
 
 

Dear white people, wake up: Canada is racist

Friday, 20 October 2017 09:28 Written by

Approximately 4,000 people gathered at Vancouver’s City Hall on Aug. 19 to protest an anti-immigration and anti-Muslim white nationalist rally. They far out-numbered the white nationalist demonstrators. Later, one counter-protester interviewed by CBC-TV news said: “I’ve never seen a racist.”

Did that counter-protester come to the rally hoping to see a racist? What do racists look like, anyway? Are they easily identifiable? Perhaps he was imagining a stereotypical neo-Nazi?

Although his statement was naive and problematic, it actually reflects common misunderstandings of white supremacy and racism in Canada.

It also reflects the mythical Canadian narrative of inclusivity and diversity. Canadians widely believe their country to be a peaceful, multicultural country without racism.

Yet human rights activists and critical race scholars provide evidence that inequity is woven into the fabric of Canadian institutions and normalized in everyday practices.

The absence of racism and racists is one of Canada’s “fable-like” racial stories. In Racism Without Racists, scholar Eduardo Bonilla-Silva says we tell and retell ourselves the same moral story.

The majority of racism “remains hidden beneath a veneer of normality,” says sociologist David Gillborn, “and it is only the more crude and obvious forms of racism that are seen as problematic by most people.”

Institutions of higher education are especially prone to reproducing inequalities beneath a “facade of meritocracy and colour blindness.”

As a Black feminist and critical researcher of race and education at UBC, it is not uncommon to encounter students and colleagues who deny not only institutional racism in Canada but also the ways in which we are all implicated.

This matrix of domination permeates our universities, schools, communities, religious institutions and even our families. That is, intersecting dimensions such as race, class, gender, sexuality, disability and religion affect us all but they can be especially powerful in Canadian institutions.

Suits and ties, a new face of white nationalism

In a recent magazine article, Toronto Black Lives Matter co-founder Janaya Khan credits the lack of critical engagement with race as contributing to the success of white nationalism in Canada.

She says Canadians “have a deep investment in seeing themselves as more enlightened than their counterparts to the south, as if racism and bigotry suddenly stop at the U.S./Canada border.”

Human rights activist and author Leonard Zeskind recently explained the new face of the movement: “It is not one of an angry Klansman in a robe — it’s a young, educated, well-spoken white American.” He describes white nationalists as “smart, mostly middle class and a democratic slice of America.”

To claim to have never seen a racist does not preclude the ubiquity of racism or white supremacy. Today, white supremacists are not white sheet, brown shirt types. But as Zeskind says, “they’re black suits, brown suits, business people.”

Engage critically with race

Those who do not experience racism may be unaware of how it functions in Canada — perniciously and insidiously. For example, The Black Experience Project, a six-year study released this July found Blacks, when compared to non-Blacks nationally, “earn lower incomes, experience higher rates of unemployment, and higher rates of incarceration. They also suffer poorer health outcomes, have more housing difficulties and are more likely to be victims of violence.”

In Vancouver, we like to tout our inclusivity and diversity without acknowledging racism or the experiences of Indigenous and racialized people.

A man wearing a rainbow mask participates in an anti racist protest on Aug. 19 at Vancouver City Hall. Approximately 4000 protestors were there to demonstrate against a white extremist rally. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

I find many residents not only ignorant of the historical Black British Columbian past but also of Black people currently living in British Columbia.

If you’re interested, a few important contributors to British Columbia Black history are: Alice Walker biographer Evelyn C. White, journalist and college professor Crawford Killan, and Wayde Compton, a Vancouver activist and acclaimed writer who is also the program director of creative writing in continuing studies at Simon Fraser University.

Challenge ‘normal’

How often do those of us who work at universities question who receives awards or who gets admitted to programs? Do we question the the lack of representation of racialized and Indigenous tenure-track and tenured faculty. Do we challenge the predominant whiteness of senior leadership teams and Canada Research Chairs? These examples illustrate how white supremacy surreptitiously and successfully performs its work.

In a recent essay, education researcher Michelle Stack gives practical examples of how white educators can work against racism.

All of us must do anti-racist and anti-oppressive work.

If only Indigenous and racialized instructors are teaching about colonialism, systemic racism and white supremacy, the burden remains greater for these marginalized faculty. The same applies to only women, or only LGBTQ instructors teaching about feminism or sexuality, or only people in disability studies teaching about disability. All of us need to be involved.

Moreover, when these subjects are taught in disparate ways in disparate departments, students cannot understand the intersections of these social dimensions.

Although we cannot be experts in all areas, we need to give students a framework to analyze the world in which they live — and will hopefully work to change.

With all of us, including senior leadership, persistently contributing to eradicating these pernicious practices and developing transformative strategies, conversations about race and equity can become part of the everyday dialogues in classrooms, departments, selection committees and wherever important decisions are made.

The white male protester who said he’d never seen a racist has most likely lived with the white privilege of never having to witness or to recognize incidents of racism that people of colour frequently encounter.

He likely would not have confronted the ways that systemic racism pervades all of our lives and is routinized in everyday Canadian life.

Whether the racism is crude and obvious — or hidden in normal routines like a sly fox — he simply may not have recognized it.

 

 

Author: :  Professor, David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education, Faculty of Education, cross-appointed to the Social Justice Institute, Faculty of Arts., University of British Columbia

Credit link:  https://theconversation.com/dear-white-people-wake-up-canada-is-racist-83124<img src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/83124/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" />

 

 

 

$3.7m fraud: Nigerian student jailed for four years in US

Friday, 20 October 2017 04:18 Written by

A Nigerian student living in the United States, Amechi Amuegbunam, has been sentenced to 46 months in prison for perpetrating fraud to the tune of $3.7m.

Amuegbunam, 30, was also ordered to pay $615, 555.12 in restitution for his role in a sophisticated email phishing scam otherwise known as Business Email Compromise that caused $3.7m loss to US companies.

The convict and other individuals were said to have between November 2013 and August 2015 sent fraudulent emails to companies in the Northern District of Texas and elsewhere containing misrepresentations that caused the companies to wire transfer funds as instructed on a PDF document that was attached to the email.

He was arrested in Baltimore in August 2015 and charged with scamming 17 North Texas companies out of more than $600,000 using the technique.

Amuegbunam was accused of sending emails that looked like forwarded messages from top company executives to employees who had the authority to wire money.

Amuegbunam tricked the employees into wiring him money by transposing a couple of letters in the actual company email, authorities said.

The Dallas investigation began in 2013 when two North Texas companies reported falling victim to the scheme, each losing about $100,000, according to the complaint.

In the case of Luminant Corp., an electric utility company in Dallas, an employee with the authority to wire money received an email from someone who appeared to be a company executive, the complaint said.

But the email domain name had two letters transposed. For example, someone created the email with a domain name of lumniant.com <http://lumniant.com>.

The duped employee wired $98,550 to a bank account outside Texas.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation subpoenaed information about the email account and learned it was created by someone named Colvis Amue, the complaint said.

In another case involving Amuegbunam, a company accountant received an email from her chief executive, who was on vacation outside the country. He asked her to transfer money for a “time-sensitive acquisition” before the day’s end, according to the FBI.

The executive said a lawyer would contact her with more information.

The accountant said such requests were not unusual.

The lawyer sent her an email with her CEO’s signature on a letter of authorisation with the company’s seal that was attached. The email gave her instructions to wire more than $737,000 to a bank in China.

The accountant learned about the scam when the CEO called the next day, saying he knew nothing about the wire transfer request.

The FBI subsequently issued an alert about the new cyber attack it called the “Business Email Compromise.” The FBI said it was a “growing fraud that is more sophisticated than any similar scam the FBI has seen before.”

FBI investigations in conjunction with the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission in Nigeria, led to the arrest of the convict.

Following the conviction of the Nigerian, the FBI commended the EFCC, for its dedication and support in bringing Amuegbunam to justice, the EFCC spokesman, Mr. Wilson Uwujaren, said in a statement.

Inside the Nursery School Where Security Guard Sprayed Children With Alcohol and Burned Them Alive (Photos)

Saturday, 07 October 2017 12:16 Written by
Sad images from the nursery school where a security guard poured alcohol on children and then burned them alive, have been released. 
Six children were killed when a security guard poured alcohol on them (Picture: AFP)
 
These are the heartbreaking photos showing the inside of a nursery where six children and their teacher were burned alive after being sprayed by alcohol.
 
It will be recalled that they were murdered by a security guard at the school who set them on fire before dying from his own injuries.
 
According to Metro UK, the tragedy happened at the Innocent People nursery in Janauba, a city in Brazil. Four children died at the scene while another two succumbed to their injuries at hospital.
 
 
 
Around 50 people were taken to hospital, 10 of them were in a serious condition and the mayor has decreed seven days of mourning.
 
The guard, who was aged about 50 and identified as Damiao Soares, died in hospital several hours after the incident, which left him with burns all over his body, Bruno Ataide Santos, director of the local hospital, said
 
About 80 children were in the nursery school when the attack occurred, prompting terrified parents to rush to the school, where they found one classroom reduced to ashes.
 
 
‘As the creche is near our house we heard noise and rushed over,’ Nelson de Jesus Silva, the father of one victim, told Globonews TV.
 
‘My little girl was so good, so smart,’ he said of his dead daughter Ana Clara Ferreira. Grief also struck Jane Kelly, the mother of Juan Miguel Soares.
 
‘I was thinking of changing nursery schools because we are preparing to move. I woke him up early to bring him here and when I saw him again he was dead in the hospital,’ Kelly said between sobs.
 
The dead children were aged four, the G1 news site reported.
 
Police visited the home of the suspect and his family members to try to determine a motive. But police superintendent Renato Nunes told the website of the Hoje em Dia newspaper that the guard had had mental health problems since 2014.
 
An injured pupil being rolled away
 
The guard had worked nights for at least eight years at the nursery school, where he was not directly in contact with the children.
 
Janauba’s mayor Carlos Isaildon Mendes said an even greater tragedy was narrowly averted.
 
‘This could have been worse because the babies’ room was in the hall next door. Evacuation would have been more difficult. As the children were bigger a lot of them were able to escape,’ the mayor explained.
 
Police searched the guard’s home and found many jugs of alcohol. He reportedly told his family this week – which includes the anniversary of the death of his father – that he was going to give a ‘gift’ to them and that he would die. Brazil’s President Michel Temer expressed his condolences on Twitter.
 
‘I am deeply saddened by this tragedy involving children in Janauba, and I want to express my solidarity with the families,’ Temer wrote.
 
As the father of a school-age child, Temer said he understood ‘this must be an extremely painful loss’ for the parents.

Popular News

UNITED States President, Donald Trump, has come under criticism for…
US President, Donald Trump has cancelled a visit to London…
Defenders of Donald Trump say his “shithole countries” remark regarding people…
A Nigerian couple, Chudy Nsobundu, 57, and his wife Sandra…

'Las Vegas Shooter Usually Screamed at Night, Had Mental Health Issues' - Girlfriend Makes New Revelation

Saturday, 07 October 2017 12:12 Written by
The girlfriend to the Las Vegas mass shooter who killed as many as 59 people in a concert, has opened up about how the man usually screamed at night. 
 
The girlfriend of Las Vegas mass murderer Stephen Paddock told the FBI he had developed 'mental health symptoms' and would scream at night, it has emerged.
 
Marilou Danley, 62, said Paddock, 64, 'would lie in bed, just moaning and screaming, "Oh my God,"' according to an ex-FBI official briefed on the situation. 
 
Investigators - who interviewed Danley after she arrived back in the US from the Philippines on Tuesday night - believe that he may have been in 'mental or physical anguish,' that official and another ex-FBI source told NBC News. 
 
However, they said that detectives are still no closer to determining Paddock's motive for the deranged shooting spree that saw him killing 59 people, including himself, and injuring 489 others.
 
While Danley's remarks suggest that Paddock was not well, investigators do not believe that his mind had deteriorated enough to set up and execute his elaborate mass-murder plan, which saw him firing on a crowd of 22,000 people at a country music festival.  
 
Other areas now under investigation are the hour-long gap between 10:15pm, when Paddock unloaded more than 200 rounds into the hall outside his room, wounding a security guard, and 11:20pm, when police breached the room and found Paddock dead on the floor.
 
Paddock did not fire at all during that time. It was suggested by Las Vegas Sheriff Joseph Lombardo that he may have been trying to devise a way to escape.
 
At around 10pm Thursday, Valley Health System announced that eight victims were still in critical condition at its hospitals following the shooting. Valley Health system has six hospitals in Las Vegas and Nevada.
 
That was an improvement on Wednesday, when 58 were still in critical condition, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. 
 
The count of injured people has been lowered from 527 to 489, Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said on Wednesday. The initial figure was accidentally inflated by hospitals in the confusion.
 
In a statement read out by her lawyer yesterday, Danley said she knew Paddock as a 'gentle' and 'quiet' man whom she loved and hoped to live a quiet life with.
 
She also said she had been oblivious to the violence he had been meticulously planning, and that she was out of the country during the attack because he'd bought her a surprise ticket to the Philippines - so, he said, she could visit her family. 
 
Danley claimed that when he wired her $100,000 - ostensibly for her to buy a house for her family - she assumed that he was breaking up with her. She said she had no idea that he was planning violence. 
 
On Thursday, Danley's brother in the Philippines, Reynaldo Bustos, 75, said that she had told him over the phone that her conscience 'is clear' over the killings.
 
In his native Tagalog, Bustos told ABC: 'I called her up immediately and she said, 'Relax, we shouldn't worry about it. I'll fix it. Do not panic. I have a clean conscience. I didn't have anything to do with this.' 
 
Bustos and his family live in Village Park, an area where middle-class Filipino families' homes are built on lots which cost around $6,000. Danley arrived bearing gifts. 
 
Bustos practices hilot, an ancient Filipino art of healing, and herbal medicine. He was not at home on Thursday and was treating a patient in Pampanga province, according to local sources. 
 
He shares his home with his son Miguel and daughter-in-law Marizalyn Joy Bustos Waniwan. Along with Bustos' work as a faith healer, the family sells duck eggs and smoked fish.
 
'I saw a nice car parked on the street,' one neighbor told DailyMail.com. 'The next-door neighbor told me that it was Marilou.' 
 
Danley is an Australian citizen who had renounced her Filipino citizenship, according to a local report by ABS-CBN. It is also not known precisely when she immigrated to Australia.
 
Her immigration status in the US has not been officially disclosed, but she married Geary Danley in 1990, and is likely to have qualified for a green card shortly after that.
 
A local told DailyMail.com that another of Danley's sisters, Dolly, owned land in a subdivision called Green Breeze.
 
Dolly is believed to live at a gated community, around 12 miles away, where homes start at around 3 million Philippine pesos or $60,000.
 
As well as speaking to Danley, investigators are also looking at 'six media devices' left behind by Paddock, and also exploring his web browsing history.
 
His web history also led to the discovery, announced Thursday, that he had apparently been scoping out other major events over the past year.
 
In August he booked a hotel room overlooking Lollapalooza in Chicago - the massively popular rock event that saw appearances by The Killers, Chance the Rapper and Muse, and that was visited by Malia Obama.
 
According to TMZ, Paddock - who lived in Nevada, 90 minutes from Las Vegas - booked two rooms at the Blackstone Hotel, overlooking Grant Park, where Lollapalooza has been held since 2005.
 
He made the booking using Expedia and insisted on a 'view room' that would overlook the festival, which ran on August 3-6, and also demanded he be notified in advance if such a room was unavailable.
 
However, officials said that he did not show up to the hotel for the booking. 
 
He also researched possible locations in Boston online, according to multiple reports. 
 
Anonymous officials said that Paddock looked for hotels near Fenway Park, where the Red Sox play and the Boston Center for the Arts.
 
It was not known if the gunman went as far as making any reservations, but an officer speaking to NBC News under condition of anonymity said that no hotels give a view over the park.
 
***

Six things to know about mass shootings in America

Thursday, 05 October 2017 01:55 Written by

America has experienced yet another mass shooting, this time at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the strip in Las Vegas, Nevada. It is reportedly the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

As a criminologist, I have reviewed recent research in hopes of debunking some of the common misconceptions I hear creeping into discussions that spring up whenever a mass shooting occurs. Here’s some recent scholarship about mass shootings that should help you identify misinformation when you hear it.

#1: More guns don’t make you safer

A study I conducted on mass shootings indicated that this phenomenon is not limited to the United States.

Mass shootings also took place in 25 other wealthy nations between 1983 and 2013, but the number of mass shootings in the United States far surpasses that of any other country included in the study during the same period of time.

The U.S. had 78 mass shootings during that 30-year period.

The highest number of mass shootings experienced outside the United States was in Germany – where seven shootings occurred.

In the other 24 industrialized countries taken together, 41 mass shootings took place.

In other words, the U.S. had nearly double the number of mass shootings than all other 24 countries combined in the same 30-year period.



Another significant finding is that mass shootings and gun ownership rates are highly correlated. The higher the gun ownership rate, the more a country is susceptible to experiencing mass shooting incidents. This association remains high even when the number of incidents from the United States is withdrawn from the analysis.



Similar results have been found by [the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (http://www.unodc.org/documents/gsh/pdfs/2014_GLOBAL_HOMICIDE_BOOK_web.pdf), which states that countries with higher levels of firearm ownership also have higher firearm homicide rates.

My study also shows a strong correlation between mass shooting casualties and overall death by firearms rates. However, in this last analysis, the relation seems to be mainly driven by the very high number of deaths by firearms in the United States. The relation disappears when the United States is withdrawn from the analysis.

#2: Shootings are more frequent

recent study published by the Harvard Injury Control Research Center shows that the frequency of mass shooting is increasing over time. The researchers measured the increase by calculating the time between the occurrence of mass shootings. According to the research, the days separating mass shooting occurrence went from on average 200 days during the period of 1983 to 2011 to 64 days since 2011.

What is most alarming with mass shootings is the fact that this increasing trend is moving in the opposite direction of overall intentional homicide rates in the U.S., which decreased by almost 50 percent since 1993 and in Europe where intentional homicides decreased by 40 percent between 2003 and 2013.

#3: Restricting sales works

Police secure the area near a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, Dec. 2, 2015. Mario Anzuoni/REUTERS

Due to the Second Amendment, the United States has permissive gun licensing laws. This is in contrast to most developed countries, which have restrictive laws.

According to a seminal work by criminologists George Newton and Franklin Zimring, permissive gun licensing laws refer to a system in which all but specially prohibited groups of persons can purchase a firearm. In such a system, an individual does not have to justify purchasing a weapon; rather, the licensing authority has the burden of proof to deny gun acquisition.

By contrast, restrictive gun licensing laws refer to a system in which individuals who want to purchase firearms must demonstrate to a licensing authority that they have valid reasons to get a gun – like using it on a shooting range or going hunting – and that they demonstrate “good character.”

The type of gun law adopted has important impacts. Countries with more restrictive gun licensing laws show fewer deaths by firearms and a lower gun ownership rate.

#4: Background checks work

In most restrictive background checks performed in developed countries, citizens are required to train for gun handling, obtain a license for hunting or provide proof of membership to a shooting range.

Individuals must prove that they do not belong to any “prohibited group,” such as the mentally ill, criminals, children or those at high risk of committing violent crime, such as individuals with a police record of threatening the life of another.

Here’s the bottom line. With these provisions, most U.S. active shooters would have been denied the purchase of a firearm.

#5: Not all mass shootings are terrorism

Journalists sometimes describe mass shooting as a form of domestic terrorism. This connection may be misleading.

There is no doubt that mass shootings are “terrifying” and “terrorize” the community where they have happened. However, not all active shooters involved in mass shooting have a political message or cause.

For example, the church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina in June 2015 was a hate crime but was not judged by the federal government to be a terrorist act.

The majority of active shooters are linked to mental health issues, bullying and disgruntled employees. Active shooters may be motivated by a variety of personal or political motivations, usually not aimed at weakening government legitimacy. Frequent motivations are revenge or a quest for power.

#6: Historical comparisons may be flawed

Beginning in 2008, the FBI used a narrow definition of mass shootings. They limited mass shootings to incidents where an individual – or in rare circumstances, more than one – “kills four or more people in a single incident (not including the shooter), typically in a single location.”

In 2013, the FBI changed its definition, moving away from “mass shootings” toward identifying an “active shooter” as “an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area.” This change means the agency now includes incidents in which fewer than four people die, but in which several are injured, like this 2014 shooting in New Orleans.

This change in definition impacted directly the number of cases included in studies and affected the comparability of studies conducted before and after 2013.

Some researchers on mass shooting, like Northeastern University criminologist James Alan Fox, have even incorporated in their studies several types of multiple homicides that cannot be defined as mass shooting: for instance, familicide (a form of domestic violence) and gang murders.

In the case of familicide, victims are exclusively family members and not randombystanders.

Gang murders are usually crime for profit or a punishment for rival gangs or a member of the gang who is an informer. Such homicides don’t belong in the analysis of mass shootings.

Editor’s note: this piece was updated on Oct. 2, 2017. It was originally published on Dec. 3, 2015.

 

 

Author:Professor of the Practice and Faculty Director of the Master's in Applied Intelligence, Georgetown University

Credit link:  https://theconversation.com/six-things-to-know-about-mass-shootings-in-america-48934<img src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/48934/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" />

 

Nigerian Hacker Jailed For 51 Months By US Court For $6.5m Fraud

Tuesday, 03 October 2017 22:51 Written by

Obinna Obioha, a Nigerian hacker has been jailed for 51 months by a New York federal judge for operating a fraud scheme that swindled $6.5 million from businesses in the U.S. and elsewhere. U.S. District Judge David N. Hurd sentenced Obinna Obioha, 31, for running a scheme in which he instructed hackers to hack into computers and email accounts of individuals around the world using malicious software.

The announcement of Obioha’s sentence was made by Acting United States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith and Vadim D. Thomas, Special Agent in Charge of the Albany Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. “Obioha, working from Nigeria, was a central figure in a fraud scheme using digital disguises and deceit to bilk businesses out of millions of dollars. We will continue to track down and bring to justice cyber criminals like Obioha no matter where they operate. I thank the FBI for its terrific work in this case identifying and apprehending Obioha,” said Acting United States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Vadim D. Thomas said: “These schemes can rob individuals and businesses of their livelihood. Cyber-crime is a serious threat and the FBI is prepared to go to any lengths to apprehend those like Obioha.” As part of his guilty plea to wire fraud in April 2017, Obioha admitted that, while in Nigeria, he worked with and instructed others to hack into computers and email accounts used by dozens of victims in the United States and around the world. The organization infiltrated victims’ computers and email accounts using malicious software (“malware”). After monitoring victims’ information to identify imminent commercial transactions, Obioha and his associates created knockoff email addresses that appeared similar to – but varied slightly from – victims’ legitimate email addresses. Obioha and his associates used those bogus email accounts to send fraudulent invoices to victims, instructing them to wire funds to bank accounts controlled by Obioha and his associates, under the pretense that the wires were payments for actual deals that had been previously negotiated by the victims. Obioha admitted that between January and September 2016, he was involved in at least 50 wire transfers, and that about $6.5 million was sent by wire to bank accounts that he and his associates controlled. The accounts received money from fraud victims in New York, Florida, Illinois, Ohio, and Texas, among other places.

During today’s sentencing, U.S. District Judge Donald N. Hurd described Obioha as “right in the middle of the action” in “very sophisticated criminal activity” designed to achieve “millions of dollars in illegal funds.” Obioha was arrested on October 6, 2016, after flying from Lagos, Nigeria, to JFK International Airport. He has been in custody since that time.

This case was investigated by the FBI and prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Wayne A. Myers.

Nigerian Hacker Jailed For 51 Months By US Court For $6.5m Fraud

Tuesday, 03 October 2017 22:51 Written by

Obinna Obioha, a Nigerian hacker has been jailed for 51 months by a New York federal judge for operating a fraud scheme that swindled $6.5 million from businesses in the U.S. and elsewhere. U.S. District Judge David N. Hurd sentenced Obinna Obioha, 31, for running a scheme in which he instructed hackers to hack into computers and email accounts of individuals around the world using malicious software.

The announcement of Obioha’s sentence was made by Acting United States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith and Vadim D. Thomas, Special Agent in Charge of the Albany Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. “Obioha, working from Nigeria, was a central figure in a fraud scheme using digital disguises and deceit to bilk businesses out of millions of dollars. We will continue to track down and bring to justice cyber criminals like Obioha no matter where they operate. I thank the FBI for its terrific work in this case identifying and apprehending Obioha,” said Acting United States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Vadim D. Thomas said: “These schemes can rob individuals and businesses of their livelihood. Cyber-crime is a serious threat and the FBI is prepared to go to any lengths to apprehend those like Obioha.” As part of his guilty plea to wire fraud in April 2017, Obioha admitted that, while in Nigeria, he worked with and instructed others to hack into computers and email accounts used by dozens of victims in the United States and around the world. The organization infiltrated victims’ computers and email accounts using malicious software (“malware”). After monitoring victims’ information to identify imminent commercial transactions, Obioha and his associates created knockoff email addresses that appeared similar to – but varied slightly from – victims’ legitimate email addresses. Obioha and his associates used those bogus email accounts to send fraudulent invoices to victims, instructing them to wire funds to bank accounts controlled by Obioha and his associates, under the pretense that the wires were payments for actual deals that had been previously negotiated by the victims. Obioha admitted that between January and September 2016, he was involved in at least 50 wire transfers, and that about $6.5 million was sent by wire to bank accounts that he and his associates controlled. The accounts received money from fraud victims in New York, Florida, Illinois, Ohio, and Texas, among other places.

During today’s sentencing, U.S. District Judge Donald N. Hurd described Obioha as “right in the middle of the action” in “very sophisticated criminal activity” designed to achieve “millions of dollars in illegal funds.” Obioha was arrested on October 6, 2016, after flying from Lagos, Nigeria, to JFK International Airport. He has been in custody since that time.

This case was investigated by the FBI and prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Wayne A. Myers.

News Letter

Subscribe our Email News Letter to get Instant Update at anytime

About Oases News

OASES News is a News Agency with the central idea of diseminating credible, evidence-based, impeccable news and activities without stripping all technicalities involved in news reporting.